Can Theological Orthodoxy Produce Political Orthopraxy?

Does Reformed Christianity imply political conservatism? Does the doctrine of Two Kingdoms promote liberty for the Christian in all areas of cultural participation except in the arena of politics, where one must always prostrate oneself before the right hand lest their commitment to orthodoxy be questioned? I, for one, hope not, both because of my distaste for ideological hegemony and my own political convictions.

Liberty as an ideal is highly prized, it just seems that for some, the practice itself is foreign. The question then, as asked over at Creed Code Cult and which I echo, is if we can affirm the freedom of belief in areas where there is not clear scriptural assessment or command, can we actually take it from head to feet and DO what we say.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Can Theological Orthodoxy Produce Political Orthopraxy?”

  1. Interesting. I have found the same to be true in my own experience.

    American Christians cannot separate the fact they think government investing in the public good is malicious is simply an American conservative cultural trait. It has nothing to do with real world numbers or biblical insight. It’s fine if one thinks that, but to baptize it as the only Christian mindset is ludicrous.

    I just finished an interesting book on arguing the formation of social values in Europe is explicitly Christian even if many people there don’t realize it. They didn’t come up with the idea to take care of all the sick out of nowhere!

    1. I think part of the problem, at least for Americans, is that political ideology gets tossed at them as an all or nothing proposition. It’s expected that when you embrace one party or the other, that you must then by association advocate all the views of the party. And that doesn’t even begin to address the drawbacks of a two party system.

      And the same thing happens in Christianity, it’s assumed that you should be a conservative because of your faith, irregardless of factual evidence or argument that you should.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s